Insurance Information

THE CRSGH National Provider Identification number is 1871556225

We accept most major insurance plans. Coverage requirements and limitations vary from plan to plan. We advise you to contact your insurance company prior to each appointment to inquire if our practice or your physician is a participating provider.

CRSGH is a participating provider in the Medicare, Medicaid and Tricare programs. This means that we accept Medicare and Tricare assignment. You are responsible for any deductible or co-insurance portions.

Many smaller insurance companies lease the networks of larger carriers so it is very important to check with you carrier by using our National Provider Identification number of 1871556225. It is the patient’s responsibility to verify with your carrier of a providers participation. If your insurance is not listed, please contact your insurance company to inquire if we are participating providers. You may provide them with our National Provider Identification number of 1871556225.

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Bloomfield Office

6 Northwestern Drive, Suite 305
Bloomfield, CT 06002
(860) 242-8591
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 9am-5pm

South Windsor Office

2400 Tamarack Avenue
Suite 200
South Windsor, CT 06074
860-648-4413
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 9am-5pm

Plainville Office

58 West Main Street
Plainville, CT
(860) 793-8562
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 9am-5pm

We offer comprehensive colorectal care. Below find a selection of some of the more common conditions and treatments that we offer.

Please choose a category...

Then select a treatment

Colonoscopy

Description

A safe, effective method to evaluate the lining of the entire colon for polyps or abnormalities. This is done using a long, flexible tube with a camera at the end. This is usually done as an outpatient and with sedation so that patients do not experience discomfort.

Symptoms

Most early colon cancers and polyps have no symptoms. Therefore, colonoscopy can be used as a screening test to look for cancers and polyps before they grow. Most patients should begin having colonoscopies at the age of 50. However, patients with a family history of cancer or polyps, a history of Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis, or certain genetic abnormalities, should have a colonoscopy at a younger age. Colonoscopies can be used to diagnose patients with symptoms as well like rectal bleeding, abdominal pain or diarrhea.

Treatment

Colonoscopy is done as an outpatient. We offer colonoscopies at several endoscopy centers and hospitals. In addition, patient's receive sedation during their colonoscopy to make it more comfortable.

High Resolution Anoscopy / Anal Dysplasia

Description

Anal dysplasia refers to abnormal cells in the anal canal which are a precursor to anal cancer. However, anal dysplasia IS NOT anal cancer and is treated very differently. It is thought to be caused by a virus called Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) which is the same virus that causes abnormal cervical cells in women. This is a particularly important issues for patients with HIV, known HPV infection, or are immunosuppressed due to medications or other conditions.

Symptoms

Most patients will have no symptoms. It is often diagnosed with an Anal Pap smear which can help identify abnormal cells.

Treatment

Abnormal cells in the anal canal, or anal dysplasia, can only be confirmed by looking at tissue under the microscope. This tissue is often identified using a technique called High Resolution Anoscopy where the anal canal is stained with tissue and observed with a microscope. CRSGH physicians have been specially trained in this technique.

Anal Cancer

Description

Anal cancer involves cancer of the end of the digestive tract. It can involve the lower aspect of the rectum, the anal canal, or the skin surrounding the anus. However, it comes from a different cell type than colon and rectal cancer. Anal cancer is often related to a virus.

Symptoms

Some patient may not experience any symptoms. Other patients may feel anal discomfort, burning or itching or may feel something abnormal when cleaning after a bowel movement. Blood in the stool, a change in bowel habits or stool characteristics, mucous discharge or swollen lymph nodes could also by a sign of anal cancer.

Treatment

Many anal cancers can be successfully treated with chemotherapy and radiation. Surgery is used selectively for patients who cannot have radiation therapy or have a recurrence of their cancer.

Colon and Rectal Cancer

Description

Colon and rectal cancer often begins as small, benign (non-cancerous) collection of cells called polyps in the large intestine. The large intestine, also called the colon, is the last part of the digestive tract, and follows the small intestine. Whiles most polyps are benign or premalignant, if undetected, some can become cancerous over time. Colorectal cancer can often be prevented, through regular screening tests, including colonoscopy, and a healthy changes in diet and lifestyle.

Symptoms

Colorectal cancer MAY NOT have any symptoms in its early stages which makes screening (or a test when you do not have symptoms) very important. Some warning signs to be concerned about include: a change in bowel habits, blood in your stool, recurring abdominal pain, weakness or fatigue, and unexplained weight loss.

Treatment

The treatment of colon cancer is usually surgery, which can often be done laparoscopically or minimally invasive (small incisions). In many cases, the ends of the bowel can be reattached for normal function. Chemotherapy and sometimes radiation may be required depending on the stage of the cancer. Rectal cancer is sometimes treated with chemotherapy and radiation prior to surgery.

Abscess

Description

An anal or perirectal abscess is a collection of pus located near the anus. Typically, this is cause by an infected gland just inside the anal canal and can be more common in certain conditions like Crohn's Disease.

Symptoms

Typically, a patient will feel a pain in the anal region, or a tender swelling or lump. Sometimes, patients will experience a fever or chills due to the infection.

Treatment

An abscess is treated by creating an opening in the skin to allow the pus to drain. Often, we can do this in the office using a local anesthetic. On occasion, an abscess may be too large or complex to drain in the office or too uncomfortable for the patient. In those situations, the abscess may need to be drained in the operating room with anesthesia.

Colon Polyps

Description

Polyps are abnormal growths that arise from the lining of the intestine. While many polyps or benign (non-cancerous), if left alone, they could develop into cancer. Some patients may have a genetic abnormality that make them more likely to grow polyps.

Symptoms

Most polyps have no symptoms. However, they can cause bleeding, mucous discharge, change in bowel habits and rarely abdominal pain.

Treatment

Many polyps can be removed during a colonoscopy. Sometimes, if a polyp is too large, it may require surgery, which can usually be done laparoscopically.

Condyloma / Anal Warts

Description

Anal warts or condyloma, are growths that occur in and around the anus. They can also affect genital areas. They are thought to be caused by a virus called Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) which transmitted via direct contact.

Symptoms

Most patients do not experience pain or discomfort, unless the growths become large. Some patients may feel small bumps around their anus or may notice itching, bleeding or discharge.

Treatment

Treatment depends on the size of the lesions and can include office based treatment, topical medications and sometimes surgery.

Fissure

Description

Fissures are tears of the skin overlying the anus. They can be very painful and require months to heal. They occur because of over-stretching of the anal canal from hard stool or from objects inserted into the rectum. They fail to heal because of an increased spasm in the muscle that does not allow the overlying skin to heal.

Symptoms

Most patients will report significant pain with bowel movements. Bleeding with bowel movements is also a common symptom.

Treatment

Treatment usually begins with avoidance of constipation and topical medications. If this does not improve, then surgery may be required.

Fistula

Description

An anal fistula is usually the result of a prior abscess. A fistula is a small tunnel that exists from small glands inside the anus to the skin on the buttocks.

Symptoms

Anal fistulas may present as recurrent abscesses, persistent or recurrent drainage from the site of a prior abscess or leakage of stool from the opening in the skin. Patients may also noted irritation of the skin around the anus.

Treatment

An anal fistula can only be cured with surgery. Many options for surgical treatments of fistulas exist. Your physician will review the surgical options with you.

Hemorrhoids

Description

Hemorrhoids are venous structures that exist within the anus. Everyone has them and they assist in helping control continence and keep stool inside. They can become enlarged, typically after prolonged episodes of straining as seen with constipation and childbirth. Many patients assume that any problem in the anal area is related to hemorrhoids, but may be due to other problems.

Symptoms

Diagnosis requires evaluation by an experienced physician. The most common complaints of hemorrhoids are itching, discomfort, and rectal bleeding. Hemorrhoids may enlarge enough to prolapsed out of the anal canal and some individuals experience a “ball” that must be pushed back inside after bowel movements.

Treatment

Hemorrhoids can be treated in a variety of ways, based on the symptoms and severity. Lifestyle changes, such as increased water and fiber intake and avoidance of straining can treat minor symptoms. For internal hemorrhoids, rubber band ligation can be performed in the office safely and without discomfort. For significant symptoms, surgery can be required. CRSGH is pleased to offer some of the latest advances in hemorrhoids therapy including stapled hemorrhoid procedures and the new "THD" procedure which result in less discomfort.

Pilonidal Cyst/Abscess

Description

Pilonidal disease is a chronic infection of the skin in the buttock crease. It usually is a result of hair that gets embedded in the skin.

Symptoms

Symptoms can vary from a small dimple to a painful swelling or lump. Some patients will develop an abscess that requires drainage by a physician. Some patients can then develop recurrent abscess or a "sinus" which can connect to the cavity under the skin.

Treatment

Treatment involves proper hygiene and use of a hair removal product to prevent additional infections of the hair follicles. In individuals who experience repeat infections, surgical treatment is required. Your physician will review options with you.

Radiation Proctitis

Description

Radiation proctitis is a condition that occurs after radiation to the pelvis for any reason. It commonly follows use of pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer, cervical cancer, or anal cancer.

Symptoms

Rectal bleeding is the most common symptom.

Treatment

The condition is diagnosed by inserting a scope or fiberoptic camera into the rectum to identify the severity of the disease following radiation treatment. It does not occur in everyone who receives radiation and treatments are available. Options include topical medication and sometimes application of a solution to reduce bleeding.

Rectal Prolapse

Description

Rectal prolapse occurs when the rectum (or lower end of the colon) turns itself inside out. The rectum will eventually protrude outside of the body.

Symptoms

Most commonly, patients will notice a mass or lump outside of their body that they sometimes need to reduce. Leakage of stool and mucous may also be noted.

Treatment

Treatment is almost always surgical. There are many options for surgery and the decision for the type of procedure is often based on the patient's age, medical conditions and prior surgery.

Rectocele

Description

A rectocele is a bulge of the front wall of the rectum into the vagina. This is often a result of an overall weakness of the pelvic floor and can be accompanied by prolapse of the bladder, uterus or vagina.

Symptoms

Many patients with a rectocele will notice difficulty moving their bowel or have a sense of incomplete emptying. Often, they may feel a bulge during bowel movements. It is important to note that while many women may have a rectocele, only a small percentage will be symptomatic.

Treatment

Treatment ranges from lifestyle changes to surgery depending on the severity of your symptoms.

Constipation

Description

Constipation can have different meanings to different people. There is a significant variation in "normal" bowel habits which is affected by diet, water intake and activity. Constipation usually refers to patients who have difficulty moving their bowels, infrequent bowel movements, straining, or need medications like enemas, suppositories or laxatives to have a bowel movement.

Symptoms

Patients may notice less frequent or smaller bowel movements. They may also notice that it is harder to go or that they need to strain to move their bowels. Some patients will experience a sensation that they do not empty their bowel completely when they go.

Treatment

Treatment is based on the cause of constipation, which is affected by many things including diet, medications, activity, water and fluid intake. Testing may be required to determine the cause such as colonoscopy and radiology tests. Treatment can range from lifestyle changes, medications, physical therapy and on occasion surgery.

Crohn's Disease

Description

Crohn's Disease is a form of inflammatory bowel disease, or inflammation of the colon. It is similar to Ulcerative Colitis, but can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract – from the mouth to the anus. It is a chronic condition and can recur many times during various time over a lifetime. Many patients with Crohn's Disease often require surgery at some point in their life, and surgery is often done to treat complications related to the disease.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms associated with Crohn's Disease include: blood in the stool, rectal pain or discomfort, abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea, and weight loss.

Treatment

Management of patients with Crohn's Disease ranges based on the severity and location of disease. It often includes medications and often surgery for complications of the disease.

Diverticulitis

Description

Diverticulitis results from inflammation of pockets (or diverticuli) within the colon wall. This inflammation typically occurs in the sigmoid colon, which is near the end of the large intestine. These areas of weakness called diverticula can also cause bleeding, though inflammation and bleeding rarely occur at the same time. Most Americans over the age of 60 have evidence of diverticula, though not everyone develops inflammation of these (or diverticulitis).

Symptoms

Most commonly patients will experience pain the left lower abdomen which may be accompanied by fevers and/or chills. Often, patients will feel bloated or constipated during a bout of diverticulitis. Some patients can develop complications of diverticulitis including a stricture, abscess, or development of a fistula (abnormal connection between the colon and another organ like the bladder or vagina.)

Treatment

The treatment of diverticulitis involves antibiotic therapy. Often, this can be done as an outpatient, but if the inflammation is severe, patients may require a hospital stay for intravenous antibiotics. Some patients experience recurrent attacks of diverticulitis and require repeat treatment. Occasionally the diverticulitis can be severe enough to cause a perforation or hole in the colon causing spillage of feces or infection into the abdominal cavity. This requires emergent surgery to fix and often results in a temporary colostomy bag on the skin. Once the inflammation has decreased (usually about 2 months), this bag can be reversed. Alternatively, recurrent attacks of diverticulitis can cause narrowing of the colon due to scar tissue. In order to prevent ongoing attacks and worsening of these symptoms, some patients undergo elective removal of the colon. This type of surgery is often possible using a minimally invasive technique and very rarely involves a bag.

Ulcerative Colitis

Description

Ulcerative Colitis is a form of inflammatory bowel disease, or inflammation of the colon. It is similar to Crohn’s Disease, but tends to affect only the colon. The inflammation starts in the rectum and works backwards towards the end of the small intestine. It is associated with varying degrees of severity. While most patients with ulcerative colitis do not require surgery, it requires care of a specialized physician trained in the disease.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms associated with ulcerative colitis include blood in the stool, rectal discomfort, pain or feeling incomplete emptying of stool, abdominal pain, diarrhea. Ulcerative colitis can be associated with other disease outside the intestine as well such as: arthritis, Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (disease of the bile ducts), Uveitis (inflammation in a part of the eyes) and skin rashes.

Treatment

Most patients with ulcerative colitis today do not require surgery. They are instead treated with medication that calms down the inflammation that causes the disease. There are several different types of medications including oral medications and intravenous or intramuscular medications called biologics that suppress your immune system (for more severe disease). Surgery is reserved for disease that does not respond to these medications or for complications arising from disease or due to side effects from the medication. Surgery offers a complete cure for ulcerative colitis should it become necessary. Surgery involves complete removal of the colon and rectum. Some patients are candidates for a surgery called a "J pouch". In this situation, the small intestine is then folded into a “J-pouch” and reconnected to the anus. This surgery usually requires a temporary bag to divert the stool, but once everything has healed, it can be reversed. Some patients may also qualify for a minimally invasive approach to this kind of pouch surgery.

Verify™ Evaluation System

Description

Fecal incontinence is the inability to control bowel movements, causing stool (feces) to leak unexpectedly.

Symptoms

Also called bowel incontinence, fecal incontinence ranges from an occasional leakage of stool while passing gas to a complete loss of bowel control.

Treatment

CRSGH is one of the first local practices to offer a high-tech, faster way for patients to try a bowel control treatment before committing to see if it might provide desperately needed long-term relief. This FDA approved treatment is called Verify™ Evaluation System, is used for basic evaluations, which last 3-7 days. Many patients have failed multiple treatments and the Verify System uses technology to make it easier and faster for patients to assess the potential of “sacral neuromodulation” for effective long-term bowel control for people suffering from chronic symptoms of bowel incontinence who have not had success with more conservative treatments. What this means is that patients can try out whether neuromodulation works for them as a treatment option before fully committing to have the device implanted, allowing them to make a long-term decision with confidence.